Department of Agriculture

USDA Announces Dates for Conservation Reserve Program Grasslands Signups

RICHMOND, VA, July 12, 2021 –– Agricultural producers and landowners in Virginia can apply for the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) Grasslands signup from today until August 20. This year, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) updated signup options to provide greater incentives for producers and increased the program’s conservation and climate benefits, including setting a minimum rental rate and identifying two national priority zones.

The CRP Grassland signup is competitive, and USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA) will provide for annual rental payments for land devoted to conservation purposes.

“USDA is excited to roll out our new and improved CRP Grasslands signup,” said R. Kevin Bohon, Acting State Executive Director for FSA in Virginia. “USDA is providing a bigger return on investment in terms of protecting natural resource benefits. The Grasslands signup is just one of the many tools available through CRP to help protect our nation’s working lands.”

Grasslands Signup

CRP Grasslands helps Virginia landowners and operators protect grassland, including rangeland, and pastureland and certain other lands, while maintaining the areas as working grazing lands. Protecting grasslands contributes positively to the economy of many regions, provides biodiversity of plant and animal populations, and provides important carbon sequestration benefits.

FSA has updated the Grasslands Signup to establish a minimum rental rate of $15 per acre, which will benefit 1,300 counties.

To focus on important wildlife corridors, FSA also identified National Grassland Priority Zones, providing extra incentives to producers for enrolling grasslands in important migratory corridors and environmentally sensitive areas – the Greater Yellowstone Elk Migration Corridor and the Severe Wind Erosion – Dust Bowl Zone. Counties within these two zones get extra ranking points as well as $5 added to their rental rate. The CRP Grasslands Ranking Factors fact sheet has additional information.

How to Sign Up

To enroll in the CRP Grasslands signup, producers and landowners should contact USDA by the August 20 deadline. Service Center staff continue to work with agricultural producers via phone, email, and other digital tools. Because of the pandemic, some USDA Service Centers are open to limited visitors. Contact your Service Center to set up an in-person or phone appointment. Additionally, more information related to USDA’s response and relief for producers can be found at farmers.gov/coronavirus.

More Information on CRP

Signed into law in 1985, CRP is one of the largest voluntary private-lands conservation programs in the United States. It was originally intended to primarily control soil erosion and potentially stabilize commodity prices by taking marginal lands out of production. The program has evolved over the years, providing many conservation and economic benefits. The program marked its 35-year anniversary this past December.

Under the Biden-Harris Administration, USDA is engaged in a whole-of-government effort to combat the climate crisis and conserve and protect our nation’s lands, biodiversity, and natural resources, including our soil, air and water. Through conservation practices, USDA aims to enhance economic growth and create new streams of income for farmers, ranchers, producers and private foresters. Successfully meeting these challenges will require USDA and our agencies to pursue a coordinated approach alongside USDA stakeholders, including state, local, and tribal governments.

USDA touches the lives of all Americans each day in so many positive ways. In the Biden-Harris Administration, USDA is transforming America’s food system with a greater focus on more resilient local and regional food production, fairer markets for all producers, ensuring access to healthy and nutritious food in all communities, building new markets and streams of income for farmers and producers using climate smart food and forestry practices, making historic investments in infrastructure and clean energy capabilities in rural America, and committing to equity across the Department by removing systemic barriers and building a workforce more representative of America. To learn more, visit www.usda.gov.

USDA is an equal opportunity provider, employer and lender.

USDA Outlines Eligibility for 2019 Supplemental Coverage Option Regarding Elections for Agriculture Risk Coverage and Price Loss Coverage

WASHINGTON, March 13, 2019 — The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Risk Management Agency (RMA) announced this week that producers who purchased or plan to purchase the 2019 Supplemental Coverage Option (SCO) policy should report Agriculture Risk Coverage (ARC) or Price Loss Coverage (PLC) election intentions to their crop insurance agent by March 15, 2019, or the acreage reporting date, whichever is later.

Producers have the option to elect either ARC or PLC through the Farm Service Agency (FSA) to receive benefits. The 2018 Farm Bill allows producers to make an election in 2019, which covers the 2019 and 2020 crop years.

The Federal Crop Insurance Act prohibits producers from having SCO on farms where they elect ARC. Because of the timing of the Farm Bill, FSA’s ARC/PLC election period will not occur until after the SCO sales closing dates and acreage reporting dates.

Producers who purchased SCO policies with sales closing dates of Feb. 28, 2019, or earlier may cancel their SCO policy by March 15, 2019. This allows producers, particularly those who intend to elect ARC for all their acres, to no longer incur crop insurance costs for coverage for which they will not be eligible.

Producers with SCO coverage now have the option to file an ARC/PLC acreage intention report with their crop insurance agent by the later of the acreage reporting date or March 15, 2019. This report will adjust the acreage report by specifying the intended ARC or PLC election by FSA Farm Number. The number of eligible acres on farms with an intention of PLC will be the number of acres insured for SCO regardless of any actual elections made with FSA. If a producer does not file an ARC/PLC acreage intention report, SCO will cover all acres as though the producer elected PLC.

The existing penalties for misreporting eligible acreage on the SCO endorsement will not apply in 2019.

Additional details about SCO can be found at www.rma.usda.gov.

Air Jordan XXXII 32 Shoes

NASS Administrator visits Virginia to speak about upcoming Census of Ag

RICHMOND, Va. – United States Department of Agriculture’s National Agricultural Statistics Service Administrator Hubert Hamer will speak about the upcoming Census of Agriculture on Nov. 11, at 7:30 a.m. at the Virginia State University Small Farm Family Conference at the Holiday Inn, Charlottesville in Ruckersville, Virginia.

Conducted once every five years, the 2017 Census of Agriculture will be mailed out to every farmer in the United States in a few weeks. It is a complete count of U.S. farms and the people who operate them. The Census is the only source of uniform, comprehensive and impartial agricultural data for every county in the nation.

Data from the Census helps to inform smart decision making to make life more efficient for farmers. For example, data from the Census help:

  • Shape programs and initiatives that benefit young and beginning farmers;
  • Expand access to resources that help women, veteran and minority farmers;
  • And help farmers diversify into new markets, including local and regional food systems, specialty crops and organic production.

Land-grant universities like Virginia State University (VSU) and Cooperative Extension programs like VSU's Small Farm Outreach Program also use the data to see where small farms are located in the state and build programs to help those farmers grow and diversify their operations.

Representatives of the media are encouraged to attend.  Administrator Hamer and VSU Small Farm Outreach Program Director William Crutchfield will be available for interviews following the breakfast Saturday morning.  There’s an additional opportunity in advance of the conference on Nov. 3, 10 a.m. to noon, for media to tour VSU’s research and educational farm for pictures, video and a deeper understanding of how census data translates into increased programs and services to farmers.

WHO:             USDA NASS Administrator Hubert Hamer, William Crutchfield, Director, VSU’s Small Farm Outreach Program

WHAT:           NASS Administrator speaking at VSU Small Farm Family Conference

WHEN:           Saturday, November 11, 2017 at 7:30 a.m.

WHERE:        Holiday Inn, Charlottesville, 5920 Seminole Trail, Ruckersville, Virginia

Saturday will begin with breakfast with Hubert Hamer, then later, lunch with Jason Brown, a former NFL player turned farmer. When Brown signed with the St. Louis Rams, he was the NFL’s highest-paid center. Five years later, he left the NFL and became a farmer.

The conference workshops will cover the practical and business aspects of farming. There will be workshops on: agroforestry, agritourism, aquaculture, cut flowers, drones, equipment for small farms, farm to table, grapes/vineyard production, grazing, growing grain for microbreweries, industrial hemp, irrigation, mushroom growing, pest management, pesticides and herbicides, soil health, sweet potato production, urban agriculture, estate planning/farm transition, how to apply for USDA FSA loans, grant writing, marketing, social media outreach for your farm business and more. Visit the conference pagefor more details.

Nike Air Jordan 11Lab4 Retro 4 Patent Leather

Subscribe to RSS - Department of Agriculture